Book Id: 50740 Tobacco mosaic virus: Application of the method of isomorphous replacement to the determination of the helical parameters and radial density distribution. Offprint. With 6 other offprints as listed below. Rosalind Franklin, Kenneth C. Holmes.
Tobacco mosaic virus: Application of the method of isomorphous replacement to the determination of the helical parameters and radial density distribution. Offprint. With 6 other offprints as listed below.
Tobacco mosaic virus: Application of the method of isomorphous replacement to the determination of the helical parameters and radial density distribution. Offprint. With 6 other offprints as listed below.
Tobacco mosaic virus: Application of the method of isomorphous replacement to the determination of the helical parameters and radial density distribution. Offprint. With 6 other offprints as listed below.
Tobacco mosaic virus: Application of the method of isomorphous replacement to the determination of the helical parameters and radial density distribution. Offprint. With 6 other offprints as listed below.
Tobacco mosaic virus: Application of the method of isomorphous replacement to the determination of the helical parameters and radial density distribution. Offprint. With 6 other offprints as listed below.
Tobacco mosaic virus: Application of the method of isomorphous replacement to the determination of the helical parameters and radial density distribution. Offprint. With 6 other offprints as listed below.

Tobacco mosaic virus: Application of the method of isomorphous replacement to the determination of the helical parameters and radial density distribution. Offprint. With 6 other offprints as listed below.

Publisher Information: 1958.

Franklin, Rosalind (1920-58); Raymond G. Gosling (1926-2015). (1) The structure of sodium thymonucleate fibres. I [-III]. Offprints from Acta Crystallographica 6 (1953) and 8 (1955). 673-677; 678-685; 151-156pp. 268 x 202 mm. Without wrappers as issued. Each offprint signed by Gosling on the first page. With:

(2) (with R. G. Gosling). Evidence for 2-chain helix in crystalline structure of sodium deoxyribonucleate. Offprint from Nature 172 (1953). 5pp. Text illustrations. 212 x 141 mm. Without wrappers as issued. Signed by Gosling on the first page. With:

(3) Structural resemblance between Schramm’s repolymerised A-protein and tobacco mosaic virus. Offprint from Biochem. et Bioph. Acta 18 (1955). 2pp., on single unbound sheet. Text illustration. 245 x 166 mm. With:

(4) (with Aaron Klug [1926-2018) and John T. Finch [1930-2017]). Structure of turnip yellow mosaic virus. Offprint from Nature 179 (1957). 3pp. 212 x 141 mm. Without wrappers as issued. With:

(5) (with Kenneth C. Holmes [1934-2021]). Tobacco mosaic virus: Application of the method of isomorphous replacement to the determination of the helical parameters and radial density distribution. Offprint from Acta Crystallographica 11 (1958). 213-220pp. Plate, text diagrams. 267 x 202 mm. Without wrappers as issued. With:

(6) Ribonucleic acid in the TMV particle. Extract from unidentified periodical, tipped to blank sheet. N.p., n.d. (ca. 1958). 159 x 152 mm. With:

(7) (with A. Klug, J. T. Finch and K. C. Holmes). On the structure of some ribonucleoprotein particles. Offprint from The Faraday Society Discussions (1958). 197-198pp., on single unbound sheet (corners lightly creased). 246 x 154 mm. Ms. correction in margin.

Together 7 works in offprint or extract form. 1953-58. Fine.

First / First Separate Editions. The collection includes examples of Franklin’s work on DNA (Nos. 1 and 2); tobacco mosaic virus (nos. 3, 5 and 6); and turnip yellow virus (no. 4).

In January 1951, after having learned X-ray crystallography techniques in Paris, Rosalind Franklin arrived at the MRC Biophysics Unit at King’s College, London, to pursue research on the structure of DNA. The head of the MRC, John T. Randall, arranged for Raymond Gosling, a graduate student previously associated with Maurice Wilkins, to work with her. At the same time, James Watson and Francis Crick were pursuing their own DNA investigations at the Cavendish Laboratory at Cambridge, which culminated, in April 1953, in the publication of their famous double-helix model of DNA structure (based in part on information derived from one of Franklin’s X-ray photographs).

In March 1953, before they were aware of the Watson-Crick model, Franklin and Gosling submitted two papers on DNA structure for publication in Acta Crystallographica. “The first describes the observations on the types of X-ray diagram given by highly orientated specimens of sodium DNA at different humidities. Two forms of DNA fibres, named A and B, are described and the conditions are given for producing them. In this paper are reproduced the beautiful X-ray photographs which were used in the subsequent analysis of both forms. The accompanying paper describes quantitative measures on the X-ray pattern of the A form . . .” (Klug, “Rosalind Franklin” [1968], p. 808). Two years later Franklin and Gosling submitted their final paper in the series, “contain[ing] an interpretation of the three-dimensional Patterson function of the A structure in which the orientation of the helical molecules in the unit cell of the crystal is analysed and a detailed picture of the arrangement of the phosphate groups is proposed.” (Klug, p. 808).

Franklin began researching tobacco mosaic virus after moving from King’s College to Birkbeck College in mid-1953. Regarding Franklin’s groundbreaking work on TMV, J. D. Bernal, her supervisor at Birkbeck College, wrote the following:

"[James] Watson had put forward the hypothesis that the large rod-shaped virus particle was composed of a helical arrangement of small protein molecules (or subunits). Franklin showed that this was, in essence, correct. Using her improved techniques, she was able to obtain spectacular, and beautiful X-ray patterns of the virus, of such clarity that she could begin a quantitative analysis of the structure. In four short years, together with a small devoted group of students and collaborators, she determined the precise helical geometry of the protein units, and above all showed that the ribonucleic acid (RNA) of the virus, the carrier of the infectivity, in other words of the genetic information, formed a long single chain embedded deeply within the protein framework" (Bernal, “Obituary notice of Rosalind Franklin,” Nature 152 [1958]: 154).

Aaron Klug, who worked closely with Franklin on the TMV virus at Birkbeck, notes that Franklin “determined the precise helical geometry of the protein units, and above all showed that the ribonucleic acid (RNA) of the virus, the carrier of the infectivity, in other words of the genetic information, formed a long single chain embedded deeply within the protein framework” (Klug, “Rosalind Franklin obituary,” The Times [London], 19 April 1958). Klug, “Rosalind Franklin and the discovery of the structure of DNA,” Nature 219 [1968]: 808-810.

Book Id: 50740

Price: $20,000.00