Universal high-speed digital computers: A small-scale experimental machine. Offprint. F. C. Williams, T. Kilburn, G. C. Tootill.

Universal high-speed digital computers: A small-scale experimental machine. Offprint

Publisher Information: 1951.

Williams, Frederic C. (1911-77); Tom Kilburn (1921-2001); Geoff C. Tootill (1922-2017). Universal high-speed digital computers: A small-scale experimental machine. Offprint from Proceedings of the Institution of Electrical Engineers 98 (1951). 13-28pp. Text diagrams. 278 x 204 mm. Original printed wrappers, detached, somewhat soiled, spine repaired with clear tape. Offprint vertically creased, but overall good. Bookplate of Erwin Tomash.

First Edition, Offprint Issue. One of the earliest scientific descriptions of the Manchester Baby computer, the world’s first electronic stored-program computer. The “Baby,” also known as the Small-Scale Experimental Machine, was designed by Williams, Kilburn and Tootill to test the Williams tube (the first random-access computer memory device); it ran its first program in June 1948. Although small and primitive, the “Baby” contained all the elements essential to a modern electronic computer. The “Baby” was developed into the Manchester Mark I (1949), which in turn served as the prototype for the Ferranti Mark I (1951), the world’s first commercially available general-purpose computer.

Book Id: 45228

Price: $750.00