Further investigations on the origin of tumors in mice. 3-part paper. Abbie E. C. Lathrop, Leo Loeb.
Further investigations on the origin of tumors in mice. 3-part paper
Further investigations on the origin of tumors in mice. 3-part paper

Further investigations on the origin of tumors in mice. 3-part paper

Publisher Information: 1915-1916.

Lathrop, Abbie E. C. (1868-1918) and Leo Loeb (1869-1959). (1) Further investigations on the origin of tumors in mice. I. Tumor incidence and tumor age in various strains of mice. Offprint from Journal of Experimental Medicine 22 (1915). 646-673pp. 266 x 183 mm. (uncut and unopened). Original printed wrappers. (2) Further investigations on the origin of tumors in mice. II. Tumor incidence and tumor age in hybrids. Offprint from Journal of Experimental Medicine 22 (1915). 713-731pp. 266 x 182 mm. Original printed wrappers. (3) Further investigations on the origin of tumors in mice. III. On the part played by internal secretion in the spontaneous development of tumors. Offprint from Journal of Cancer Research 1 (1916). 19pp. 267 x 181 mm. Original printed wrappers. Together 3 items. Edges of wrappers slightly chipped, stamps of the Yale Medical Library on front wrappers. Very good.

First Editions, Offprint Issues of these groundbreaking papers on the heritability of breast cancer in mice. Lathrop, a breeder of pet mice and other small animals in Granby, Massachusetts, began noticing that certain of her mouse strains had the tendency to develop breast tumors. She sent samples of these tumor-prone mice to several scientific researchers, including pathologist Leo Loeb, who was then on the faculty of the University of Pennsylvania. Loeb confirmed the mouse mammary tumors as cancerous, and he and Lathrop

"embarked on a five-year program of joint research on the nature and transmission of the tumors in these mice. Surprisingly, although at this time women researchers were often denied credit for their work or treated like mere assistants, the Lathrop and Loeb collaboration appears to have been genuine, and Lathrop appeared as full co-author in all of the publications from the project.

"The ten articles Lathrop and Loeb wrote over the period from 1913 to 1919 represent the first work establishing the connection between certain strains of mice and the inheritance of cancer. . . . Lathrop and Loeb used breeding experiments with the “silver fawn” and other Granby mice to show that the incidence of mammary tumors varied among different “families” of mice: for example, such tumors were high in the “English tan” and “sable” but low in “cream.” Furthermore, they reported that ovariectomies reduced the frequency of mammary tumors, while pregnancies increased it. And finally, they observed that when members of high-tumor and low-tumor families were crossed the incidence of tumors in the new generation emulated that of the high-tumor family" (Rader, Making Mice: Standardizing Animals for American Biomedical Research, 1900-1955, pp. 42-43).

During the period of his research with Lathrop, Loeb was appointed director of the Barnard Free Skin and Cancer Hospital in St. Louis, where he pursued his cancer researches and gained an international reputation. His collaboration with Lathrop ended with her death from pernicious anemia in 1918. Garrison-Morton 2642 (part III only: “Demonstration of the influence of an internal secretion on the development of spontaneous cancer”).

Book Id: 43156

Price: $2,000.00

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