Book Id: 38895 Collection of 28 offprints, including his Nobel Prize work. Joshua Lederberg.
Collection of 28 offprints, including his Nobel Prize work.
Collection of 28 offprints, including his Nobel Prize work.

Collection of 28 offprints, including his Nobel Prize work.

Publisher Information: 1956-1987. Book Id: 38895

Foundation of Bacterial Genetics

Lederberg, Joshua (1925- ). (1) (with Edward L. Tatum [1909-75]) Novel genotypes in mixed cultures of biochemical mutants of bacteria. Offprint from Cold Spring Harbor Symposia on Quantitative Biology 11 (1946). 113-114pp. Original printed wrappers, creased horizontally, margins a bit sunned. (2) (with Tatum). Gene recombination in the bacterium Escherichia coli. Offprint from J. Bacteriology 53 (1947). 673-684pp. Without wrappers. Light dust-soiling. Lederberg's address label tipped to first page. (3) (with Norton D. Zinder [1928- ]) Genetic exchange in salmonella. Offprint from J. Bacteriology 64 (1952). 679-699pp., plus mimeographed addenda sheet. Without wrappers. Light soiling to first & last leaves. Bound in a volume (blue cloth, gilt-lettered spine) with 27 other offprints by Lederberg (either alone or in collaboration), as listed below, plus one other offprint by Lederberg laid in loosely, and a paper by Lederberg's wife, Esther Lederberg. See list below for full descriptions. Volume bound for G. and E. Meynell, of the biology laboratory at the University of Kent, with their initials on the spine and address label on the inside front cover. Overall very good.


(1) & (2) First Separate Editions. Garrison-Morton 255.4. (no. [2]). Lederberg shared the 1958 Nobel Prize for physiology or medicine with Tatum and George Beadle for their essential contributions to bacterial genetics. Among these contributions was Lederberg and Tatum's discovery of sexual processes in the reproduction of certain strains of E. coli bacteria, which they first announced at the July 1946 symposium at Cold Spring Harbor in their paper "Novel genotypes in mixed cultures of biochemical mutants of bacteria." "Gene recombination in the bacterium Escherichia coli," their first complete paper on bacterial sexual reproduction, was published the following year.

[Lederberg and Tatum's] data showed that only when two mutants [the B-M- and T-P- mutants of the K-12 strain of E. coli] were mixed were prototrophs obtained: When single strains were plated, only the parental type was obtained. Even more significant, when prototrophs (recombinants) were tested for T1 resistance (the unselected marker), it was found that some were sensitive, others were resistant, but the frequency depended on which parent carried the resistant marker (Brock, Emergence of Bacterial Genetics, p. 82).

This crucial discovery, together with the methodology developed by Tatum and Lederberg, provided the foundation for all subsequent research in genetic recombination.

Lederberg had originally intended to study medicine, but he abandoned medical school after two years to study biochemical genetics under Tatum at Yale University. His early work in Tatum's laboratory was focused primarily on searching for sexual reproduction in bacteria. Bacteria at the time were thought to reproduce only asexually through cell division; sexual reproduction, if proven to exist in bacteria, would help explain how new genetic information could be introduced into these one-celled organisms.


"[Lederberg] soon found that some strains of the colon bacteria Escherichia coli were capable of sexual reproduction. Observed sexual reproduction in these bacteria was achieved by the process named conjugation. In conjugation, the two bacteria involved become joined together by a conjugation tube; the "male" bacterium injects its chromosomal information into the "female" bacterium. Then, the daughter cell produced by this conjugation divides asexually.


These observations led Lederberg and Tatum to carry out experiments in bacterial genetic recombination by examining the consequences of crossing (mating) two different bacterial strains. The resultant bacterial offspring they isolated were found to be a third strain, possessing characteristics of both parent strains used in the cross. Lederberg and Tatum names the process sexual genetic recombination and laid down the foundation for the modern science of bacterial genetics" (Magee, Nobel Prize Winners: Physiology or Medicine, p. 779).


(3) First Separate Edition. Garrison-Morton 256.1. Lederberg left Yale in 1947 for the University of Wisconsin, where he founded and chaired that university's Department of Medical Genetics. During his tenure at Wisconsin he continued his studies in bacterial genetic recombination, collaborating with his wife, Esther Lederberg, and several other research associates. With one of these, his former student Norton Zinder, Lederberg discovered another means of introducing new genetic material into bacteria: the process of transduction, in which small fragments of hereditary material are transferred from one bacterium to another through the action of a bacterial virus. Lederberg and Zinder's discovery was published in their 1952 paper, "Genetic exchange in salmonella."

Among the gene transfers that Lederberg carried out were the immunity to antibiotics and the resistance to these therapeutic drugs. These studies demonstrated that disease production and the resistance to disease by microorganisms were mediated by genetic processes. The identification of conjugation and transduction as means of introducing desired new genes into bacteria enlarged the methodology for investigation of the chemistry of heredity (Magee, pp. 779-80).

The papers described above are bound into a volume containing 29 other offprints on bacterial genetics by Lederberg (alone or with collaborators), published between 1946 and 1961. Among these are Lederberg's "Gene recombination and linked segregations in Escherichia coli" (no. 1 below), containing the first genetic map of E. coli; Lederberg and Zinder's "Concentration of biochemical mutants of bacteria with penicillin" (nos. 2 and 3 below), describing the penicillin selection method of isolating bacterial mutants; and Lederberg, Cavalli and Lederberg's "Sex compatibility in Escherichia coli" (no. 12 below), announcing their independent discovery of the sex-determining F factor in E. coli K-12. Also included are a paper by Lederberg's wife (no. 32) and Lederberg's important 1987 review of his scientific work (no. 31). Many of the offprints listed below are cited by Brock in the discussion of Lederberg and Tatum's work contained in chapters 5.1 - 5.3 of his Emergence of Bacterial Genetics (1990), the definitive history of this field (see the list below for citations).

1. Gene recombination and linked segregations in Escherichia coli. Offprint from Genetics 32 (1947). 505-525pp. Without wrappers. Stamp of A. A. Miles. Brock, pp. 85, 110.

2. (with Norton Zinder). Concentration of biochemical mutants of bacteria with penicillin. Reprint from J. Am. Chem. Soc. 70 (1948). Mimeographed typescript. [4]pp. Without wrappers. Brock, pp. 87, 111.

3. (with Norton Zinder) Concentration of biochemical mutants of bacteria with penicillin. Offprint (together with Bernard Davis's "Isolation of biochemically deficient mutants of bacteria by penicillin") from J. Am. Chem. Soc. 70 (1948). [2]pp. Original printed wrappers, horizontally creased, edges a bit sunned.

4. Problems in microbial genetics. Offprint from Heredity 2 (1948). 145-198pp. Original printed wrappers. Brock, p. 110.

5. Aberrant heterozygotes in Escherichia coli. Offprint from Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. 35 (1949). 178-184pp. Without wrappers. Light soiling.

6. The selection of genetic recombinations with bacterial growth inhibitors. Offprint from J. Bacteriology 59 (1950). 211-215pp. Original printed wrappers, back wrapper moderately soiled. Brock, pp. 87, 111.

7. Streptomycin resistance: A genetically recessive mutation. Offprint from J. Bacteriology 61 (1951). 549-550pp. Single sheet, without wrappers. Edges a bit frayed, light fingersoiling. Brock, pp. 87, 111.

8. Prevalence of Escherichia coli strains exhibiting genetic recombination. Offprint from Science 114 (1951). [2]pp. Single sheet, without wrappers. Creased horizontally, light wear along fold. Brock, pp. 88, 111.

9. (with E. M. Lederberg, N. D. Zinder & E. R. Lively) Recombination analysis of bacterial heredity. Offprint from Cold Spring Harbor Symposia on Quantitative Biology 16 (1951). 413-443pp. Without wrappers. Light toning at edges. Brock, pp. 87, 111.

10. (with Esther M. Lederberg) Replica plating and indirect selection of bacterial mutants. Offprint from J. Bacteriology 63 (1952). 399-406pp. Without wrappers. Stamp of A. A. Miles. Brock, p. 111.

11. Cell genetics and hereditary symbiosis. Offprint from Physiological Reviews 32 (1952). 403-430pp. Without wrappers. Light soiling.

12. (with Luigi L. Cavalli & Esther M. Lederberg) Sex compatibility in Escherichia coli. Offprint from Genetics 37 (1952). 720-730pp. Original printed wrappers. Stamp of A. A. Miles. Brock, pp. 91-92, 111.

13. (with Esther M. Lederberg) Genetic studies of lysogenicity in Escherichia coli. Offprint from Genetics 38 (1953). 51-64pp. Original printed wrappers, creased vertically. Stamp of Elinor McCloy.

14. (with E. L. Tatum) Sex in bacteria: Genetic studies, 1945-1952. Offprint from Science 118 (1953). 7pp. Without wrappers. Light toning. Brock, p. 111.

15. (with Philip R. Edwards) Serotypic recombination in salmonella. Offprint from J. Immunology 71 (1953). 232-240pp. Without wrappers.

16. (with N. D. Zinder & B. A. D. Stocker) Transduction of flagellar characters in salmonella. Offprint from J. General Microbiology 9 (1953). 410-433pp., plate. Without wrappers. Light soiling.

17. Bacterial protoplasts induced by penicillin. Offprint from Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. 42 (1956). 574-577pp. Without wrappers. Signature of Elinor Meynell.

18. Conjugal pairing in Escherichia coli. Offprint from J. Bacteriology 71 (1956). 497-498pp. Without wrappers.

19. (with L. L. Cavalli-Sforza) Isolation of pre-adaptive mutants in bacteria by sib selection. Offprint from Genetics 41 (1956). 367-381pp. Without wrappers. Meynell signature.

20. Linear inheritance in transductional clones. Offprint from Genetics 41 (1956). 845-871pp. Without wrappers.

21. (with P. D. Skaar & Alan Richter) Correlated selection for motility and sex-incompatibility in Escherichia coli K12. Offprint from Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. 43 (1957). 329-333pp. Without wrappers.

22. Sibling recombinants in zygote pedigrees of Escherichia coli. Offprint from Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. 43 (1957). 1060-1065pp. Without wrappers.

23. (with Jacqueline St. Clair) Protoplasts and L-type growth of Escherichia coli. Offprint from J. Bacteriology 75 (1958). 143-160pp. Without wrappers.

24. Genes and antibodies. Offprint from Science 129 (1959). 1649-1653pp. plus mimeographed addenda sheet. Without wrappers. Edges a bit frayed.

25. Exobiology: Approaches to life beyond earth. Offprint from Science 132 (1960). 393-400pp. Without wrappers. Edges a bit frayed.

26. (with Peter H. A. Sneath) Inhibition by periodate of mating in Escherichia coli K-12. Offprint from Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. 47 (1961). 86-90pp. Without wrappers. Meynell signature.

27. (with Eugene W. Nester) Linkage of genetic units of Bacillus subtilis in DNA transformation. Offprint from Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. 47 (1961). 52-55pp. Without wrappers.

28. Genetic recombination in bacteria: A discovery account. Offprint from Ann. Rev. Genet. 21 (1987). 23-46pp. Without wrappers. Laid into bound volume of offprints. Brock, p. 111.

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29. Lederberg, Esther M. Allelic relationships and reverse mutation in Escherichia coli. Offprint from Genetics 37 (1952). 469-483pp. Without wrappers. Last leaf toned.

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