18 offprints on antisepsis, chemotherapy, including the discovery of Lysozyme, the first antibiotic discovered. Alexander Fleming.

18 offprints on antisepsis, chemotherapy, including the discovery of Lysozyme, the first antibiotic discovered.

Publisher Information: 1922-1940.

Discovery of Lysozyme and Penicillin

Fleming, Alexander (1881-1955). Collection of 18 offprints, as listed below. Various sizes (largest is 249 x 185 mm.). All in original wrappers or without wrappers as issued; see below for more detailed condition statements. 12 of the 18 offprints are presentation copies, with the author's stamp and (in one case) inscription. Very good set.

First Separate Editions, including the extremely rare offprint of Fleming's first major discovery--lysozyme. Garrison-Morton 1910.1. Fleming, who shared the Nobel Prize in 1945 for his discovery of penicillin, devoted most of his career to investigating antibacterial mechanisms in the human body. This group of offprints--two-thirds of which are presentation copies--highlights Fleming's investigations of lysozyme, and of the antibacterial properties of sulfonamides.

Lysozyme, one of the body's defenses against bacterial infection, was discovered by Fleming in 1921 during a search for agents that slowed bacterial growth but were not-unlike most chemical antiseptics-too toxic to take internally. One day, when he had a cold, he added a drop of mucus to a bacterial culture and found, to his surprise, that it dissolved the bacteria. Upon investigation Fleming found that the active agent was present not only in nasal mucus but in tears, blood serum, milk and saliva. His first paper on lysozyme (no. [1] below; Garrison-Morton 1910.1) was published in 1922.

Lysozyme and penicillin (discovered in 1928) are Fleming's two outstandingly important antibacterial discoveries. Although of limited use pharmacologically, lysozyme deserves pride of place as the first discovered antibiotic, and it has also proved valuable in studies of bacterial cytology due to its specific disruptive action on the cell walls of certain gram-positive organisms.

After the publication of Gerhard Domagk's landmark paper on Prontosil, the first of the "sulfa" drugs, Fleming began researching the antibacterial properties of sulfonamides [nos. 9, 10, 15]. Sulfonamides were the first chemically-based drugs to show only minimal toxicity; effective against a wide range of microbes, they were the "wonder drugs" prior to the stabilization and purification of penicillin (by Florey and Chain) in 1940..

1. On a remarkable bacteriolytic element found in tissues and secretions. Garrison-Morton 1910.1. Offprint from Proc. Roy. Soc. B 93 (1922). [306]-317pp. Plate. Orig. printed wrappers, tear in rear wrapper mended with tape, some creasing. Presentation inscription on front cover: "With the author's compliments." Rear wrapper stamped "H. C." (for Harvey Cushing?). Stamp of Yale Medical Historical Library.

2. On the effect of variations of the salt content of blood on its bactericidal power in vitro and in vivo. Brit. J. Exp. Path. 7 (1926). 274-281pp. Orig. printed wrappers, front wrapper stamped "With the author's compliments." Stamp of William H. Welch Medical Library, Johns Hopkins.

3. A simple method of removing leucocytes from blood. Offprint from Brit. J. Exp. Path. 7 (1926). 281-286pp. Plate. Orig. printed wrappers, front wrapper stamped "With the author's compliments." Stamp of William H. Welch Med. Lib.

4. On the development of strains of bacteria resistant to lysozyme action and the relation of lysozyme action to intracellular digestion. Offprint from Brit. J. Exp. Path. 8 (1927). 214-218pp. Orig. printed wrappers, front wrapper a bit soiled.

5. On the influence of temperature on the rate of agglutination of bacteria. Offprint from Brit. J. Exp. Path. 9 (1928). 231-235pp. Orig. printed wrappers, front wrapper a bit soiled.

6. The bactericidal power of human blood and some methods of altering it. Offprint from Proc. Roy. Soc. Med. 21 (1928). 25-33pp. Orig. printed wrappers.

7. Arris and Gale lecture on lysozome. A bacteriolytic ferment found normally in tissues and secretions. Offprint from Lancet (1929). 12pp. Without wrappers as issued. Sl. soiled.

8. Some problems in the use of antiseptics. Offprint from Brit. Dental J. (1931). 13pp. Orig. printed wrappers, front wrapper stamped "With the author's compliments." Stamp of William H. Welch Med. Lib.

9. The antibacterial action in vitro of 2-(p-aminobenzenesulphonamido) pyridine on pneumococci and streptococci. Offprint from Lancet (1938). 14pp. Original printed self-wrappers, front wrapper stamped "With the author's compliments."

10. Serum and vaccine therapy in combination with sulphanilamide or M and B 693. Offprint from Proc. Roy. Soc. Med. 32 (1939). 911-920pp. Orig. wrappers, front wrapper stamped "With the author's compliments."

11. Recent advances in vaccine therapy. Offprint from Brit. Med. J. 2 (1939). 16pp. Without wrappers as issued. Stamp of William H. Welch Med. Lib.

12. The effects of antiseptics on wounds. Offprint from Proc. Roy. Soc. Med. 33 (1940). 8pp. Without wrappers as issued, first page stamped "With the author's compliments."

13. Antiseptics and chemotherapy. Offprint from Proc. Roy. Soc. Med. 33 (1940). 10pp. Without wrappers as issued, first page stamped "With the author's compliments." Stamp of William H. Welch Med. Lib.

14. Discussion on the effect of antiseptics on wounds. Offprint from Proc. Roy. Soc. Med. 33 (1940). 487-502pp. Orig. printed wrappers.

15. Observations on the bacteriostatic action of sulphanilamide and M & B 693 and on the influence thereon of bacteria and peptone. Offprint from J. Path. & Bacteriol. 50 (1940). [2], 69-81pp. Original printed wrappers, front wrapper stamped "With the author's compliments."

16. Chemotherapy in ophthalmology. Offprint from Modern Trends in Ophthalmology (London: Butterworth, 1940). 493-498pp. Original printed wrappers indicating that this is an author's presentation copy; front wrapper stamped "With the author's compliments."

17. Chemotherapy and wound infection. Offprint from Proc. Roy. Soc. Med. 34 (1941). 6pp. Without wrappers as issued, first page stamped "With the author's compliments."

18. A pneumcoccus which required CO2 for its growth. Offprint from Lancet (1941). 2pp. Without wrappers as issued, first page stamped "With the author's compliments." Stamp of William H. Welch Med. Lib.

Book Id: 38345

Price: $4,500.00

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